Not 1948

Sep 1, 2018


Doesn’t anyone proofread anything any more? The inside cover of the current issue (Volume 2 Number 10) of the Titan UK reprint titled Superman/Batman spreads disinformation about when the first appearance of Superman in the States actually happened. They’re only ten years out.

Advertisements

The 1950s K.G Murray Superman comics weren’t the first time reprints of Superman appeared in the UK. “Triumph” comic reprinted Superman for 21 issues beginning in 1939. The run from #772-793 includes four with a Superman cover appearance.

The Atlas annuals and Thorpe and Porter’s “Super DC” in the 1960s through Egmont’s magazines, pocket books and annuals in the 1980s right up to the current Titan reprints have all featured Superman here in the UK. Often forgotten about is Fleetway’s “Radio Fun” comics of 1959 to 1961 that featured Superman. Superman daily newspaper strips were adapted here into two page (or sometimes one-and-a-half page) stories. “Radio Fun” merged with “Buster” in 1961. So Superman also appeared in “Buster” for a few months too.


.


.
They used the same image a few weeks later!?! Kids in the UK would assume Superman’s costume was all-red.
.

PS:Buster comic began May 1960 and would go on to incorporate the following defunct UK comics, sometimes continuing with a couple of strips from the now-defunct title:
Radio Fun
Film Fun
Giggle
Jet
Cor!
Monster Fun
Jackpot
School Fun
Nipper
Oink
Whizzer and Chips
(and of course the above comics had also incorporated other titles themselves.)
The last Buster comic appeared in January 2000.

Yet More Gutsman

Aug 1, 2017

I’ve mentioned Gutsman comics before here and here. They aren’t the easiest comics to track down so when I bumped into these recently whilst visiting eBay looking for something else entirely I just had to acquire them.

These comics are pretty odd and unique being wordless, although there are a number of “word balloons” (filled with images not words!). And neat touches like games and paper dolls to cut out.

.

.

Erik seems to have moved up a few gears since the Gutsman days. He’s now producing Graphic novels. In 2016 “In the Pines” was published and is available in German, French, Italian (and presumably Dutch/Flemish) but not currently in English (PS: An English version appeared in 2018) . His next graphic novel will be about Vikings in the year 900AD!!

Wonder Woman is back in the news with a new movie. Which gives me the perfect excuse to listen (?!?) to this comic book. If you’d like to listen to this comic book too then click here.

There were a number of these “Peter Pan” records and comics produced in the late 1970s. I enjoyed this one immensely and am now on the lookout for more.

Surprisingly the story in the comic book that accompanies this record is unique and not a reprint from an earlier DC comic. The artwork is surprisingly good too. According to the GCD it was drawn by Rich Buckler and inked by Neal Adams and Dick Giordano from a period when both were at the top of their game.

The Death of Batman

Jul 1, 2017

.

R.I.P William West Anderson   19/09/1928 – 09/06/2017

.

.

.

Firkin by Hunt Emerson and Tym Manley

.

Prog 633 of 2000AD dated 30th June 1989 was the final issue with a cover without a barcode. The back cover boasted that forthcoming issues would contain a free bar code for its lucky readers. Well, it amused me for at least 4.35 seconds…..

History lesson: The barcode was first proposed in the late 1940s/early 1950s and finally utilised in a few industries in the 1960s. The first use in retail happened in June 1974. A National Cash Register scanner was installed at Marsh’s supermarket in Troy, Ohio. On June 26, 1974, the first product with a bar code was scanned at a check-out counter. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum. The pack of gum wasn’t specially designated to be the first scanned product. It just happened to be the first item lifted from the shopping cart by a shopper whose name is long since lost to history. Today, the pack of gum is on display at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.